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  • COA Accredits Pain Fellowship for CRNAs



    First-ever nurse anesthesia fellowship accredited by
    Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs

    PARK RIDGE, IL. - For the first time, the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA) has accredited a post-graduate fellowship for nurse anesthetists, making Hamline University's Post-Graduate Advanced Pain Management Fellowship a part of nurse anesthesia educational history.

    The COA is the accrediting agency for nurse anesthesia educational programs in the United States and its territories.

    "This is a defining moment in accreditation history for our profession. It provides new opportunities for advanced learning in a variety of areas for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs)," said COA Chair Kay Sanders, CRNA, DNP.

    In January 2014 the COA established Standards for Accreditation of Post-Graduate CRNA Fellowships (Fellowship Standards). CRNA fellowships will provide advanced educational opportunities for CRNAs to advance their practice and the nurse anesthesia profession. The Fellowship Standards support the accreditation of fellowship offerings in areas of specialty practice such as pediatrics, obstetrics, and pain management, and in nonclinical concentrations such as leadership or government affairs.

    The Advanced Pain Management Program at Hamline, which is a post-graduate certificate program created in collaboration with the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA), gives CRNAs a higher level of pain management skills.

    "Accreditation of Hamline's Advanced Pain Management Program further distinguishes the curriculum as both rigorous and offering a higher level of pain management knowledge," said Hamline University Administrator Keith Barnhill, CRNA, PhD, ARNP. "I am excited about the opportunities the accreditation of fellowships will create for CRNAs and other healthcare providers. As a CRNA, it is a privilege to be a part of this ground-breaking event."

    Designed to be completed in four semesters, the Hamline program offers graduates a Post-Master's Certificate in Advanced Pain Management. Didactic and clinical components are required to complete the program for CRNAs. The didactic content includes: Theoretical Foundation of Pain Imaging and Radiation Safety, Assessment, Diagnosis and Referral; Pharmacology, Interventional Pain Practice, Spiritual Aspects of Health and Illness, and various non-allopathic aspects related to pain. The curriculum will include rotation through clinical sites and provide a mentoring relationship between well-experienced pain practitioners and students seeking to expand their knowledge of pain management. Individuals interested in obtaining information regarding the Hamline University Advanced Pain Management Program should contact Vicky Giannopoulos at vgiannopoulos@aana.com or 847-939-3530.
    Individuals interested in establishing a fellowship for possible COA accreditation are encouraged to contact the COA at accreditation@coa.us.com or 847-655-1160.

    About the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs

    The accreditation program for nurse anesthesia was initiated in 1952 by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA). The accreditation function was transferred to the COA in 1975. The COA is a not-for-profit corporation that supports quality assessment and improvement in nurse anesthesia educational programs and nursing specialty fellowships. The Council's scope is accreditation of (1) institutions and programs of nurse anesthesia at the post-master's certificate, master's or doctoral degree levels in the United States, and its territories including programs offering distance education, and (2) nursing educational programs, institutions and individuals that award post graduate certificates, diplomas, and award education credit for nursing specialty fellowships that meets nationally established standards of academic quality. For more information, visit http://home.coa.us.com.

    About Hamline University's Advanced Pain Management Program

    The Advanced Pain Management Program is a postgraduate certificate program. This program, created collaboratively by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) and Hamline University, gives advanced practice nurses a higher level of pain management skills. Designed to be completed in four semesters, graduates will receive a Post-Master's Certificate in Advanced Pain Management.

    About the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists

    Founded in 1931 and located in Park Ridge, Ill., the AANA is the professional organization representing more than 47,000 Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) and student registered nurse anesthetists. As advanced practice registered nurses, CRNAs administer approximately 34 million anesthetics to patients in the United States each year and are the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America. In some states, CRNAs are the sole anesthesia professionals in nearly 100 percent of rural hospitals. For more information, visit www.aana.com.
    Comments 10 Comments
    1. Johnga's Avatar
      Johnga -
      I had always wondered why we did not have post-graduate fellowships. Certainly the interest was there, however there was no standardized mechanism by which to attain such training. Pediatrics, Cardiac anesthesia, neuro, trauma-these are all specialties for which we should have fellowships. I hope that this is the first of many such CRNA programs.
    1. gaspass3's Avatar
      gaspass3 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Johnga View Post
      I had always wondered why we did not have post-graduate fellowships. Certainly the interest was there, however there was no standardized mechanism by which to attain such training. Pediatrics, Cardiac anesthesia, neuro, trauma-these are all specialties for which we should have fellowships. I hope that this is the first of many such CRNA programs.
      I agree in principle. I will be curious to see how much tuition is for this program. I suspect since they know it is CRNAs applying, it will be even more expensive. I hope I am wrong.

      Trauma Fellowship though, I can't really see the purpose of that. Trauma care is more cookie cutter and algorithm based that anything else I have done. My 0.02
    1. chansoncrna's Avatar
      chansoncrna -
      The cost is there check the site http://www.hamline.edu/education/cer...anagement.html... As for the cost I suppose it's comparable to going to CRNA school as RNs, we pay an exorbitant amount because we want the satisfaction (in whatever form) of getting the education-recall we don't (typically) get paid residencies or fellowships. As far as tuition by a per semester basis is comparable to CRNA school. I am in my second semester at Hamline, and would say I have no regrets. I have attended multiple Jack Neary courses as well and came to realize there is so much more to pain management than what many within or even outside our profession may know. I feel it is much more legitimate to have a university based accredited program and would hold more weight with hospital credentialing committees and in the future payers (rumor has it that CMS will in the future require fellowship trained providers for reimbursement of some pain practices). I can also assure you it is a field that CRNAs belong in, and should be proud to provide as a service that meets a significant need in this country.
    1. MmacFN's Avatar
      MmacFN -
      As i understand it the cost is about 50K. At the recent jack nearly class i was at in manchester Iowa a number of the students from the program were there, which i sortof found odd...

      However, none of them said they regretted the hamline program. Having said that if you are not planning to do a full on pain practice and walk away from anesthesia for the most part the return on investment just isnt there. Most injections are paying 100-120$ per injection and the E&M codes for seeing them in an office is about 50 bucks.

      Yes, you have to see them somewhere before and after the injections for follow ups. You cant just go do one because a surgeon asked for it you have to assess them.

      So this means some degree of overhead, a low reimbursement and time away from making money in anesthesia. If you are doing the whole pain practice where you see many patients and manage their meds, do narc contracts and the whole show there is money there. However, being a procedurlist like me where im just doing LESIs, transforaminals, SIs and facets but NOT writing scripts or running a full on pain practice I dont see the benefit in the hamline program right now.

      thats my take on it.


      Quote Originally Posted by chansoncrna View Post
      The cost is there check the site http://www.hamline.edu/education/cer...anagement.html... As for the cost I suppose it's comparable to going to CRNA school as RNs, we pay an exorbitant amount because we want the satisfaction (in whatever form) of getting the education-recall we don't (typically) get paid residencies or fellowships. As far as tuition by a per semester basis is comparable to CRNA school. I am in my second semester at Hamline, and would say I have no regrets. I have attended multiple Jack Neary courses as well and came to realize there is so much more to pain management than what many within or even outside our profession may know. I feel it is much more legitimate to have a university based accredited program and would hold more weight with hospital credentialing committees and in the future payers (rumor has it that CMS will in the future require fellowship trained providers for reimbursement of some pain practices). I can also assure you it is a field that CRNAs belong in, and should be proud to provide as a service that meets a significant need in this country.
    1. gaspass3's Avatar
      gaspass3 -
      Then there is the question of how many "simulated" procedures the program requires. Maybe "observe" a few as well.
    1. captgaston's Avatar
      captgaston -
      Mike, I was concerned about same things. Thanks for the heads up on details. I too do not see myself opening a full service pain clinic. (ESP in OH).
    1. chansoncrna's Avatar
      chansoncrna -
      Sorry on my smartphone trying to reply, I would be happy to further discuss advantages disadvantages of Hamline, but I don't feel a public forum is appropriate. I can assure you I am not "simulating" procedures and would be happy to have more discussions regarding pain mgmt as a provider who currently practices and is open to talking about the importance of an accredited fellowship.

      As i understand it the cost is about 50K. At the recent jack nearly class i was at in manchester Iowa a number of the students from the program were there, which i sortof found odd...

      However, none of them said they regretted the hamline program. Having said that if you are not planning to do a full on pain practice and walk away from anesthesia for the most part the return on investment just isnt there. Most injections are paying 100-120$ per injection and the E&M codes for seeing them in an office is about 50 bucks.

      Yes, you have to see them somewhere before and after the injections for follow ups. You cant just go do one because a surgeon asked for it you have to assess them.

      So this means some degree of overhead, a low reimbursement and time away from making money in anesthesia. If you are doing the whole pain practice where you see many patients and manage their meds, do narc contracts and the whole show there is money there. However, being a procedurlist like me where im just doing LESIs, transforaminals, SIs and facets but NOT writing scripts or running a full on pain practice I dont see the benefit in the hamline program right now.

      thats my take on it.[/QUOTE]
    1. MmacFN's Avatar
      MmacFN -
      Hey

      Not sure who said you were simulating procedures. As i understand it the students in the Hamline program setup clinical with actual pain practices and perform the procedures.

      However, I want to review the return on investment. It is relevant to the conversation. I did so in the private forum HERE
    1. Uptown CRNA's Avatar
      Uptown CRNA -
      The actual cost from their website is $1200/credit for 19 credits and $2500/clinical practicum times 4 semesters which equals $32,800. But I am sure that does not include cost of materials and travel. Like Mike said, the cost will be closer to $50K when you add in all the extras and time lost in work. The principle is good, but I don't see the ROI, however, if the cost of the program is lower it might be worth it.
    1. Kljorg's Avatar
      Kljorg -
      The Fellowship Idea is great but the Hamlin Program is only eligible for CRNAs who are residents of 6 states so why accredit something that is not available to all members of the association
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