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Flipballin80
12-02-2006, 10:16 PM
Hi guys,

I have a question regarding LORs. If I am going to be applying to more than one school, do I ask the person to write a letter to each school I am applying to, or do I ask them to write me a generic letter for my intention to apply to an NA school?

What did you guys do?

I don't what to seem like a burden to the ones who are writing a recommendation for me.

Ron :laufband:

betsy lew
12-02-2006, 11:21 PM
Ron -
Some of the schools I applied to had specific things they wanted the recommender to adress in the letter, some just wanted a generic letter, others wanted a reference form filled out but no letter, some wanted the references mailed directly to them and others wanted all the letters to be returned with the application. All of the schools that wanted the letters to be returned with the application wanted the recommendations to be in sealed envelopes with the recommenders signature across the seal. So I would see what each school you are applying to wants and then go from there. By the end, I kind of felt like I was a burden to those writing my recommendations, but they were all very gracious.
Betsy

MmacFN
12-02-2006, 11:42 PM
Good question

I think betsy hit the nail on the head.

Few schools take photocopied generic letters. You will often need one sealed to give them and they often prefer that it be addressed to them.

Im sure your references will understand! :)


Hi guys,

I have a question regarding LORs. If I am going to be applying to more than one school, do I ask the person to write a letter to each school I am applying to, or do I ask them to write me a generic letter for my intention to apply to an NA school?

What did you guys do?

I don't what to seem like a burden to the ones who are writing a recommendation for me.

Ron :laufband:

Mumbatex
12-02-2006, 11:53 PM
All the schools I applied to had preprinted questionaire/ranking forms that my reccommenders had to fill out. I applied to four schools so I gave my reccommenders all 4. They were really very gracious and most of them had been through this process with others. I didn't want to spread out the people I asked for reccomendations because I only asked the people I trusted the most in the respective positions of authority asked for. I really wanted to make sure I got a knowledgeable and positive reccomendation. Just give them plenty of time to get them done. ( I gave mine about a month). Good luck.

FutrCRNA
12-03-2006, 05:59 AM
My situation was the same as Mumba's - the 4 schools I applied to had pre-printed forms/questionnaires. I made up little packets for each person I was getting LORs from: I put all the forms (each with its own stamped envelope addressed to the appropriate school) in a folder. That way, all the person had to do was fill out the form and drop it in the mail.

And, like Betsy, I felt a little like I was being a burden asking each person to fill out all those forms but I kept reminding myself that they were once in our shoes asking someone for a letter. They were all very gracious and happy help me out.

Good luck to you!

WickedNurseRed
12-03-2006, 07:17 AM
Everyone's already given excellent advice, and the only thing I wanted to add was to make sure you give the people filling out your forms plenty of time to complete them. You wouldn't want anyone to feel rushed when filling them out.

Also, both schools I applied to had lengthy forms to fill out, but all of my references provided letters as well. It allowed them to give a person account of my strong points.

Frogger
12-03-2006, 11:42 AM
All right on, just remember to send a follow up thank-you note to those writing your LOR's

Flipballin80
12-03-2006, 12:47 PM
Thank you all the advice! I like the idea of making a little package for each person so all they have to do is just fill out the letter and send it. I also like the idea giving them time to fill it out. Also, writing thank you notes are essential to show gratitude for their time and effort.

How early should I begin asking for LORs? How old can LORs be?

Ron :laufband:

FutrCRNA
12-03-2006, 12:59 PM
How early should I begin asking for LORs? How old can LORs be?



Well, I think you should start the whole application process asap and get it all done. But to answer your question, I'll use my application as an example: the deadlines for application at the schools I applied to were Nov 15th and Dec 1st. I started the whole process in May (yeah, that early) and had everything completed and in by the end of June/beginning of July. I don't think you can get things in too early, plus I think it gets you in the "interview pile" sooner. JMHO...

Frogger
12-03-2006, 01:11 PM
Thank you all the advice! I like the idea of making a little package for each person so all they have to do is just fill out the letter and send it. I also like the idea giving them time to fill it out. Also, writing thank you notes are essential to show gratitude for their time and effort.

How early should I begin asking for LORs? How old can LORs be?

Ron :laufband:

This is something I had to think about. Alot of it has to do with how may schools you are applying to. If your only applying to 1 school than obviously no big deal. If your applying to 4 or 5 than it can get confusing as schools usually have all different forms and deadlines. I tried to get all my LOR's at the same time--I did not want to have to re-ask the same person several times for another reference letter. I suggest giving all your LOR's at once in a folder that your writer can fill out all 3, 4, or 5 forms all at once. I asked for LOR's about 3-4 months before the first school's application deadline. As I recieved my remaining LOR's early I just applied to the other schools really early--usually not a problem when you ask, and many schools like them really early anyway and it can get your app. looked at much sooner. As about how old LOR's can be--good idea to ask the school--out of the 4 I applied to 1 told me they did not want it more than 2-3 months old by the time I applied.

RN29306
12-04-2006, 09:11 AM
The 3 schools I applied to essentially wanted the reference letters in the application to the school - one big package. These schools also wanted the person filling out the letters to seal the envelope and then sign his or her name across the seal to assure that the contents were not read by your truly.

hehe.....:)

Sometimes in these circumstances is when the hierarchy of nursing can rear up and bite you....even trusted friends. You all know what I'm talking about. Listed below is what I did and it does take some estimation that the reference letter writers are consistent among the letters he or she writes.

Say you have 3 schools you want to go to. Take paperwork from a school you have no intention of attending and throw this in the mix. The people filled out the references and gave the sealed and signed letters back to me. I took the letters for the 4th school (the one I had no intention of going to) and opened the letters. All the references, except for one, were truthful and non-biased. But one referencer decided to apparently tell the adcom some things that were biased. So I yanked her letters for all the schools. Like I said, you have to assume some things with this, but at least you have an idea of what the people are saying.

Application to CRNA school isn't the time to be taking chances on reference writers.

Good luck.

Mumbatex
12-04-2006, 09:30 AM
Sometimes in these circumstances is when the hierarchy of nursing can rear up and bite you....even trusted friends. You all know what I'm talking about. Listed below is what I did and it does take some estimation that the reference letter writers are consistent among the letters he or she writes.

Say you have 3 schools you want to go to. Take paperwork from a school you have no intention of attending and throw this in the mix. The people filled out the references and gave the sealed and signed letters back to me. I took the letters for the 4th school (the one I had no intention of going to) and opened the letters. All the references, except for one, were truthful and non-biased. But one referencer decided to apparently tell the adcom some things that were biased. So I yanked her letters for all the schools. Like I said, you have to assume some things with this, but at least you have an idea of what the people are saying.

Application to CRNA school isn't the time to be taking chances on reference writers.

Good luck.

:hail: Wow, never even thought of that one. Just legal enough to slide by with. I agree with you 100%. Not the time to be messing around. Even people you know will sometimes feel the urge to over balance their estimation of you sometimes. That's why I am a big fan of keeping it limited to a selected few who you trust.

RAYMAN
12-04-2006, 09:31 AM
That Drew, always thinking ahead :beerglass:

FutrCRNA
12-04-2006, 02:02 PM
Damn, Drew! You are a tricky one...

I'm not sure which is worse, not knowing what is written about you or having one of your references hand you the letter to read and say, "Now don't make a liar out of me." No pressure there...but she did write some really nice things.

RN29306
12-04-2006, 02:34 PM
Damn, Drew! You are a tricky one...




My day of vindication to this woman was faxing her the origional reference letter.....and my dipolma when I graduated.

Not a word has been said since.

:)

RAYMAN
12-04-2006, 02:52 PM
My day of vindication to this woman was faxing her the origional reference letter.....and my dipolma when I graduated.

Not a word has been said since.


AAAHHHHHHHHHHH

Flipballin80
12-04-2006, 03:35 PM
Good ideas! Good ideas!! I guess my first step is to see what the application dates are for the school I want to apply to and begin my app. process. Man, I didn't really realize how daunting this whole process can get. They should have a central place to where we can submit our apps. in, kinda like how pre-med students submit their info to AMCAS. We should have a similar process.

Ron:laufband:

PropofolDiva
06-27-2007, 08:27 PM
The school I am applying to needs a LOR from a professor. I have not attended traditional classroom settings in over 5 years. I did contact an old professor who can not remember who I am but states that if I send her my CV and some other info she would try to do it.
I email the school I am interested in and they state just make sure the LOR is from someone who knows enough about me to write it. I am trying not to be a pain but if that's the case why state who should write the LOR? Should I just go ahead and have my old boss and 2 CRNAs write it or should I do a CRNA, a supervisor and a professor like the application states?
Anyone come across this? What did you do?

armygas
06-28-2007, 06:09 AM
The 3 schools I applied to essentially wanted the reference letters in the application to the school - one big package. These schools also wanted the person filling out the letters to seal the envelope and then sign his or her name across the seal to assure that the contents were not read by your truly.

hehe.....:)

Sometimes in these circumstances is when the hierarchy of nursing can rear up and bite you....even trusted friends. You all know what I'm talking about. Listed below is what I did and it does take some estimation that the reference letter writers are consistent among the letters he or she writes.

Say you have 3 schools you want to go to. Take paperwork from a school you have no intention of attending and throw this in the mix. The people filled out the references and gave the sealed and signed letters back to me. I took the letters for the 4th school (the one I had no intention of going to) and opened the letters. All the references, except for one, were truthful and non-biased. But one referencer decided to apparently tell the adcom some things that were biased. So I yanked her letters for all the schools. Like I said, you have to assume some things with this, but at least you have an idea of what the people are saying.

Application to CRNA school isn't the time to be taking chances on reference writers.

Good luck.

Drew, you sly dog............

Here is what I did, just ask for a copy of the LOR. (If they say no, then you may not want that reference).

Chaos
06-28-2007, 08:31 PM
I haven't seen this brought up before but every LOR form I have seen has a part where you can waive your rights or not to have it being a big secret. The first time I applied, I waived my rights and didn't have the balls to ask for a copy like Armygas suggested. This year I said screw it, signed "I do Not waive my rights", read and copied each LOR. I copied them because schools have lost many things along the way. I read them because it's my life these other people have in their hands and I wasn't going to let a half arsed letter get through. I was prepared to answer during my interview why I read the LORs but it never came up and I got in. To this day, I still don't know what was in my first set of LORs. Big mistake. Another thing I did was gave each of the letter writers my goal statement so they understood the gravity of their letter. Sometimes people think it's some chinzy form that they can just mark and sign. I also went to people who were rooting for me.

armygas
06-28-2007, 08:38 PM
I also went to people who were rooting for me.

You have learned the greatest of all lessons grasshoppa!!

DebbieC
06-30-2007, 02:52 PM
I know this is sorta an old thread but I have 2 things to add:

1. Drew, WOW! What a truly fabulous idea. And I LOVE the pay-back!!!!!! Everyone reading this thread for info before they have applied should do this.

2. If one of your references is a surgeon, and even more so, a cardiac surgeon, and IF he/she is a cardiac surgeon who is the head of a big department, give him/her MONTHS to get it done. And likely, it will be done by an assistant. keep in touch with the doc's executive assistant.