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dewey
10-06-2010, 01:08 PM
Hello,

I am entering a CRNA program soon (Jan), I got into a program a cycle before I thought I would, and I am wondering if I should even bother sitting for the CCRN. Do employers look for as you come out of school? I know that it would lapse as, to my understanding, there is no way to fulfill the continuing acute bedside hours requirement moving forward. Prepping for it now before school would really suck, but I would do it if needed.

Background:I had taken a prep class though my employer 2-3months ago, but then I ended up getting an acceptance before even beginning my own prep. I've spent the time since getting the rest of my life in order to relocate for school, and still have plenty more to do on that end.

Esper
10-06-2010, 01:14 PM
Don't worry about CCRN. The only initials that matter after your name will be CRNA.

Out of curiosity, what school are you going to? You can send a pm if you want.


Hello,

I am entering a CRNA program soon (Jan), I got into a program a cycle before I thought I would, and I am wondering if I should even bother sitting for the CCRN. Do employers look for as you come out of school? I know that it would lapse as, to my understanding, there is no way to fulfill the continuing acute bedside hours requirement moving forward. Prepping for it now before school would really suck, but I would do it if needed.

Background:I had taken a prep class though my employer 2-3months ago, but then I ended up getting an acceptance before even beginning my own prep. I've spent the time since getting the rest of my life in order to relocate for school, and still have plenty more to do on that end.

infidel
10-06-2010, 01:28 PM
Do not waste your time or money... unless you want a lot of alphabet soup after your name like nursey nurses do.....

Burnt2
10-06-2010, 01:32 PM
i let mine expire; it's useful for the application process, that's about it

JadamR15
10-06-2010, 03:14 PM
I've found the CCRN material helpful for many parts of anesthesia school....especially hemodynamics, etc....

gregsto
10-06-2010, 04:49 PM
NO

armygas
10-06-2010, 06:20 PM
Joan Smith ASN, BSN, ACLS, CCRN, OMFG.......

Don't be that person.........

propoFool
10-06-2010, 06:26 PM
Joan Smith ASN, BSN, ACLS, CCRN, OMFG.......

Don't be that person.........

agreed.

SuccsDrugs&Rocuron
10-06-2010, 06:28 PM
Joan Smith ASN, BSN, ACLS, CCRN, OMFG.......

Don't be that person.........
bwahahaha!! ROFLMAO

ethernaut
10-06-2010, 06:33 PM
ROFLMAO
c'mon, were ya really?

SuccsDrugs&Rocuron
10-06-2010, 06:35 PM
living in a motel room with another student (who's snoring bigtime!) eating frozen dinners & continually studying anesthesia, i am quite easily amused :)

(livin' the dream, baby!)

lvl1micuRN
10-07-2010, 05:59 PM
Joan Smith ASN, BSN, ACLS, CCRN, OMFG.......

Don't be that person.........

What?!? You mean, don't be any of the instructors that lectured in my undergrad courses or the guest lecturers???
And I thought going to CRNA school meant I got to put MSN, CRNA onto my current alphabet soup, you burst my bubble.

ethernaut
10-07-2010, 06:26 PM
What?!? You mean, don't be any of the instructors that lectured in my undergrad courses or the guest lecturers???
And I thought going to CRNA school meant I got to put MSN, CRNA onto my current alphabet soup, you burst my bubble.
i saw this on another forum.. ridiculous. and it isn't even the longest i've seen. it seems females are more prone to the alphabet soup than guys. go figure.
"xxxx x. xxxx, MS, RN, CFN, LNCC, DABFN, FABFEI, CNLCP"

RAYMAN
10-07-2010, 06:37 PM
i saw this on another forum.. ridiculous. and it isn't even the longest i've seen. it seems females are more prone to the alphabet soup than guys. go figure.
"xxxx x. xxxx, MS, RN, CFN, LNCC, DABFN, FABFEI, CNLCP"

Forgot BFD

infidel
10-07-2010, 07:25 PM
I guess I would not mind all those letters... but SOMEWHERE there has to be a table to tell me what they mean so i know what level of impressed I should be. New clipboard NIP ( Nurse in pumps) .... on her door were her initals... BSN MSN RNFA and ..CNA..... I asked her why she put Certified Nursing Assistant on her door tag....... She looked very hurt I did not know it meant Certified Nurse Administrator.

ethernaut
10-07-2010, 07:29 PM
I guess I would not mind all those letters... but SOMEWHERE there has to be a table to tell me what they mean so i know what level of impressed I should be. New clipboard NIP ( Nurse in pumps) .... on her door were her initals... BSN MSN RNFA and ..CNA..... I asked her why she put Certified Nursing Assistant on her door tag....... She looked very hurt I did not know it meant Certified Nurse Administrator.
i woulda laughed in her face. maybe she woulda spread the word, more so than just the, uh, pumps.

lvl1micuRN
10-17-2010, 06:54 PM
Shouldn't just one letter sum it up? i.e. can't have one without the other?
CRNA = BSN + RN + MSN + probably CCRN/ACLS/PALS/etc. (excluding those who have been practicing since before the MSN, but we can still assume they have enough credentials to get them by)
I guess we can assume that those who have the plethora of letters failed freshman algebra?

ethernaut
10-18-2010, 06:59 PM
CRNA = BSN + RN + MSN + probably CCRN/ACLS/PALS/etc. (excluding those who have been practicing since before the MSN, but we can still assume they have enough credentials to get them by)

excluding those seasoned vets, this is an incorrect assumption. not all current CRNAs have a BSN nor an MSN. and neither are required, nor should be. (nursing-degree-based wise).

Dennis Horn
10-25-2010, 02:07 PM
I took the CCRN 15 years ago, and was proud of the title working in a busy ICU. Then after finishing my 27 month anesthesia training, the CCRN was a total joke, no comparison to the amount of physiology and pharmacy you will learn and understand.

JadamR15
10-29-2010, 05:20 PM
I took the CCRN 15 years ago, and was proud of the title working in a busy ICU. Then after finishing my 27 month anesthesia training, the CCRN was a total joke, no comparison to the amount of physiology and pharmacy you will learn and understand.

Yup. Wh

lvl1micuRN
11-02-2010, 01:09 PM
Currently learning cardiac anatomy and physiology at the core science level (phys/pathophys are next semester), and the information from studying the CCRN is definitely helpful in putting together the pieces as far as the cardiac math & cardiac cycle in this topic goes.
Also having taken care of incredibly sick heart patients in a CCU is helpful. The topics are pure review for now, I'm sure patho is going to take me for a ride though.

Esper
11-02-2010, 06:28 PM
Currently learning cardiac anatomy and physiology at the core science level (phys/pathophys are next semester), and the information from studying the CCRN is definitely helpful in putting together the pieces as far as the cardiac math & cardiac cycle in this topic goes.
Also having taken care of incredibly sick heart patients in a CCU is helpful. The topics are pure review for now, I'm sure patho is going to take me for a ride though.

I think if the topics are strictly review, then you aren't being taught enough.

lvl1micuRN
11-03-2010, 05:29 AM
Like I said, phys/pathophys are coming up and are going to take us for a fun ride. Its also not review for everyone in the cohort, I'm only speaking for myself. It is a multitude of factors in preparing for this such as not taking 100-level pre-nursing courses and taking real biochem/micro/etc in undergrad, studying up on every sick patient while in the unit, etc. Keep in mind I'm only referring to the basic cardiac A&P example that we're on right now. Other stuff like nervous system, GI, arterial supply? Not review, not at all.
Was just trying to illustrate the usefulness of studying the textbooks on your sick patients on the ICU (something anyone considering CRNA school should do with their free time on the unit), learning everything you need for the CCRN, and having good academic prep prior to CRNA school, not implying anything other than that.
I have faith we're learning everything we need to be outstanding CRNAs, going off the programs' board pass rates and reputation in the area.

Esper
11-03-2010, 10:20 AM
Sorry, I didn't mean to knock your program. I'm sure it's fine. I just know everyone in my class learned something in almost every lecture they didn't know, like the conduction times (and not sa node to av but from sa to bottom LV to top of LV vs same in RV) or exactly how thebesian circulation flows (which I was aware of but not intimate with). Perhaps you're just talking about basics like frank starling, EF, flow through heart, afterload (which should be review) and I'm talking about the high level stuff. Maybe it's because our PD has a phd in physiology and she just goes more in depth than she needs to.

Like I said, phys/pathophys are coming up and are going to take us for a fun ride. Its also not review for everyone in the cohort, I'm only speaking for myself. It is a multitude of factors in preparing for this such as not taking 100-level pre-nursing courses and taking real biochem/micro/etc in undergrad, studying up on every sick patient while in the unit, etc. Keep in mind I'm only referring to the basic cardiac A&P example that we're on right now. Other stuff like nervous system, GI, arterial supply? Not review, not at all.
Was just trying to illustrate the usefulness of studying the textbooks on your sick patients on the ICU (something anyone considering CRNA school should do with their free time on the unit), learning everything you need for the CCRN, and having good academic prep prior to CRNA school, not implying anything other than that.
I have faith we're learning everything we need to be outstanding CRNAs, going off the programs' board pass rates and reputation in the area.

ethernaut
11-03-2010, 06:41 PM
... thebesian circulation ...
it's been a while, but isn't this what increases at a really good broadway showing?